Review

Concrete Conference on ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces

Large audience of contractors and engineers met on Ballroom Level of Armani Hotel, Burj Khalifa in Dubai

The Concrete Conference 2015 is part of an educational campaign launched by MEVA Formwork Systems in cooperation with the American Concrete Institute (ACI) with the aim of reaching an international professional audience on the new ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces. The conference in the Armani Hotel, Burj Khalifa, Dubai, was held on Monday, 23rd November, 2015, with around 80 guests from around the world meeting to hear Keynote speaker Rolf Spahr, who spearheaded the Guide and was honoured as one of the five most influential persons in the concrete construction industry in the USA. The ACI is one of the most influential concrete institutions and is active in 100 countries across the globe.

Conflicting Expectations are History: A Fair Play Milestone

Years of work and MEVA know-how went into the new guide, which clearly defines the features of formed concrete surfaces. This puts the contractor, developer, architect and engineer in a position to agree on the desired concrete finish, provides clarity for fair play and stops conflicting expectations that give rise to dispute. It is the basis for talking to one another in consensus.

The new ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces

In his address, Rolf Spahr elaborated on the international context of formed concrete surfaces, the developments in the concrete industry and the history of concrete as a building material. He also explained the interrelations between German, Austrian, British and American approaches and explained how the new Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces (347.3R-13) came about. His explanation of the implications for the developer, architect, engineer and concrete contractor was a main focus.

Four concrete surface categories (CSC) defined

CSC 1 has the lowest and CSC 4 the highest classification for a finished concrete surface. Concrete surface levels are designed for individual parts of the structure or the entire surfaces to reflect the owner’s requirements and include precise definitions of:

  • texture,
  • surface void ratio, 
  • colour uniformity, 
  • surface irregularities, 
  • Construction and facing joints. 

It defines when a mock up is recommended and what type of form-facing category is required in for each class.

 

Review

Concrete Conference on ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces

Large audience of contractors and engineers met on Ballroom Level of Armani Hotel, Burj Khalifa in Dubai

The Concrete Conference 2015 is part of an educational campaign launched by MEVA Formwork Systems in cooperation with the American Concrete Institute (ACI) with the aim of reaching an international professional audience on the new ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces. The conference in the Armani Hotel, Burj Khalifa, Dubai, was held on Monday, 23rd November, 2015, with around 80 guests from around the world meeting to hear Keynote speaker Rolf Spahr, who spearheaded the Guide and was honoured as one of the five most influential persons in the concrete construction industry in the USA. The ACI is one of the most influential concrete institutions and is active in 100 countries across the globe.

Conflicting Expectations are History: A Fair Play Milestone

Years of work and MEVA know-how went into the new guide, which clearly defines the features of formed concrete surfaces. This puts the contractor, developer, architect and engineer in a position to agree on the desired concrete finish, provides clarity for fair play and stops conflicting expectations that give rise to dispute. It is the basis for talking to one another in consensus.

The new ACI Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces

In his address, Rolf Spahr elaborated on the international context of formed concrete surfaces, the developments in the concrete industry and the history of concrete as a building material. He also explained the interrelations between German, Austrian, British and American approaches and explained how the new Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces (347.3R-13) came about. His explanation oft he implications for the developer, architect, engineer and concrete contractor was a main focus.

Four concrete surface categories (CSC) defined

CSC 1 has the lowest and CSC 4 the highest classification for a finished concrete surface. Concrete surface levels are designed for individual parts of the structure or the entire surfaces to reflect the owners‘ requirements and includes precise definitions of:

  • texture,
  • surface void ratio, 
  • colour uniformity, 
  • surface irregularities, 
  • construction and facing joints. 

It defines when a mock up is recommended and what type of form-facing category is required in for each class.

 

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
ROLF SPAHR

“Years ago, I was asked to get involved in the ACI to bring in my formwork knowledge and experience. After looking at the various guides and documents, such as ACI 34 7. 301 and 117, I realised that there was no clarity on surface texture. My goal was to clearly define the various features of a formed surface. The result is the new ACI 347.3R-13 Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces which took 6 years of dedicated work before being published in December 2014. Now we are informing professionals about the new guide. I firmly believe it will put everyone in a better position to agree on the desired concrete surface finish. It will push people to sit together as a team. Talking together is always the best way.“

More about the Fair Play campaign